How to Draw a Hot Dog using Inkscape

The old frankfurter finally gets to shine its glory in this tutorial. We’ll be drawing a hot dog, a bun, and possibly some sort of condiments!

1. Drawing a Hot Dog

Step 1

Achieving the signature sausage shape is easy – just use the Rectangle tool to draw a thin rectangle, but then drag the circle node to round the ends all the way.

rounded rectangle hot dog

Step 2

To start some shading, grab the Pen tool to draw a white line and a black line like I have below. We’ll be blurring these to create proper shading.

highlight and shadow

Step 3

Use the Fill and Stroke panel to Blur the lines at about 9%.

hot dog shading

Step 4

Since the blurred lines now bleed over the hot dog, we’ll need to do some clipping to clean up the edges. To do this, duplicate the original hot dog shape (this will be our new main shape). Next, Object > Group the white and black lines together, then Object > Lower to Bottom that group so that it’s behind the hot dog. Finally, select the original hot dog along with the group of lines and do Object > Clip > Set. Whew!

clipping shading

Step 5

We’re not done yet, though. What you should end up with is a perfectly hot dog shaped shading object. We need to place this over the new hot dog shape now.

clipped shading

Step 6

Using Align and Distribute, we can easily center the shading object over the hot dog.

align shading

2. Split Ends for the Hot Dog

Step 1

You know those split ends where they cut the hot dog off the line? That’s what we’ll be adding next. Grab the Polygon tool and set it to Star mode. Then, set the settings to what I have below and draw yourself a pointy star.

polygon tool

Step 2

Duplicate another hot dog shape and position the star at the end of it like I have below. Now, select the star and the hot dog and use Path > Intersection to get your shape.

star over hot dog

Step 3

You can also just duplicate another one and flip it horizontally.

hot dog split end shape

Step 4

Again, use Align and Distribute to perfectly position the split ends on both sides of the hot dog. There we go, one hot dog!

hot dog no bun vector

3. Gotta Have a Bun!

Step 1

For the bun, we’ll draw it the same way as the hot dog. Use the Rectangle tool and round the corners completely.

rounded bun

Step 2

In fact, we’ll even do the shading the same way. Two lines, blur, clip, etc.

rounded bun shading

Step 3

I wanted to add a little bread texture also, so I duplicated the original bun shape, and went up to Filters > Overlays > Canvas Transparency. We can place this texture over the actual bun (using Align and Distribute, of course).

inkscape bread texture

Step 4

Below, you’ll see the texture overlay on the bun. Looks pretty good so far!

hot dog half bun

Step 5

But we still have the other half of the bun to do, which will be an internal view instead. I’ve used the same shape as before, but made it a lot lighter in color.

other bun

Step 6

I wanted to give it a crust border, so I went to Filters > Shadows and Glows > Drop Shadow. I set my settings as I have them below and changed the Blur color the my previous bun color.

inkscape inner glow

Step 7

I also did the same texture overlay.

inner bread texture

Step 8

Now we just need to position our buns.

hot dog vector

4. What About the Mustard?

You’re right. We’ve got to do at least one topping. I’ve chosen to use my hand crafted, custom Ketchup filter to create this neat mustard topping. Looks great!

hot dog in bun mustard vector

Well, Hot Dog!

This tutorial is part of 5 Easy Holiday Drawing Tutorials Using Inkscape

What a fun tutorial this was, especially if you’re a fan of hot dogs. We ended up using a lot of Inkscape’s tools and features to create this nice looking hot dog vector. Thanks for reading!

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