Create a Dynamic Striped Background for the Web

In this tutorial, we’ll be using Inkscape to create a simple and very useful website background. Using transparent and repeating stripes, we can make an overlay that works with any color in the world.

The Final Result

1. Preparing Inkscape

Step 1

This repeatable background will be 200px by 200px, so let’s head up to File > Document Properties to get that started.

document properties

Step 2

Then select the Grids tabs and enable a grid with these settings.

inkscape grid settings

Step 3

Before we start drawing, we also need to go to the Snapping toolbar and enable snapping, snap nodes/handles, and snap to grids (or just copy my settings below).

enable snapping


2. Draw Some Lines!

Step 1

We can now use the Pen tool to draw a diagonal section like I have below. Snapping should kick in and make this very easy.

draw diagonal stripe


Step 2

And continue as shown. Make sure everything is perfect so that the repeating pattern matches up.

diagonal repetition


Step 3

You get the idea.

diagonal grid snapping


Step 4

When you finish drawing all of your sections, go ahead and select them all and remove the Stroke, but add a black fill with 6.0 Opacity.

transparent diagonal lines


Step 5

You could be done at this point, but I’ve also added a smaller diagonal line with less Opacity to create a neat effect.

transparent stripe background

Step 6

Finally, we just export our background image and throw it into a webpage. Try toggling some colors below!

That’s It!

This dynamic, repeatable stripe background is very versatile and looks quite good with just about any color. If you’re interested, you can also create a dynamic static texture background in Inkscape. Thanks for reading!

Want to learn more?

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

+ 8 = 15

Copyright 2016 GoInkscape! - Privacy - Disclosure - Contact Us
Keep Reading!
realistic grass tutorial
How to Draw Realistic Grass using Inkscape

Grass is very hard to emulate just because of how much of it there usually is in a single scene....